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QUENTIN TARANTINO'S FOOT FETISH

by Luis Calvo, guest contributor.  [February 13, 2004]

 

 

 

[HollywoodInvestigator.com]  It's no secret that Quentin Tarantino has a foot fetish. The subject of his obsession with ladies' paws was discussed in a Village Voice article last year, quoted on the Everything Tarantino site:

 

"When Thurman's The Bride wakes from a coma and escapes from the hospital in Kill Bill, she struggles to get her paralyzed feet to regain sensation. For what seems like minutes these totemic toes fill the screen. The guy digs her dogs, and he turns them into something huge and pure pop on the screen -- you want to shout at them toes to start a-wiggling. It's not just that he's a foot fetishist, but that he takes what he cares about -- personal, quirky stuff -- and transforms it into art. He hooks you in, too."

-- New York Metro shares as part of a guide on Pictures: Tarantino, Quentin: his huge foot fetish, p. 314.

 


Two books, published in January, reportedly mention Tarantino's foot love: Joe Eszterhas's memoirs of his years racking up $3-4 million paychecks to write classic films like Basic Instinct and Showgirls, Hollywood Animal, and Peter Biskind's account of the 1990s indie film scene focusing on Sundance and Miramax, Down and Dirty Pictures. Cindy Adams's column in The New York Post shared one catchy line from Hollywood Animal: "Quentin Tarantino sucked Cameron Diaz's feet."

True Tarantino buffs should've known this already. His movies don't feature graphic sex scenes or nudity, but most hint at his foot fancy:

Reservoir Dogs. No female characters here, no ladies' feet, the budget probably didn't allow for them.

 

 

Pulp Fiction. A close shot of Mia (Uma Thurman) as her feet glide across her bedroom. "When Tarantino was meeting with her about Pulp Fiction, he reportedly proffered a friendly foot rub. In that movie, mobster Tony Rocky Horror got tossed out of the window by Ving Rhames for giving Thurman's character a foot massage.” (Village Voice)

From Dusk Til Dawn. From what curvy part of Salma Hayek's physique does Tarantino, who wrote the script but didn't direct, sip liquor off of? Nope, her bare toes.

Jackie Brown: Louis (Robert De Niro) first spots Melanie (Bridget Fonda) early in the film by noticing her toe ring next to his drink. A closeup of Fonda's footsies next to his ice-filled drink does catch the eye though.

 

 

Kill Bill"When Thurman's The Bride wakes from a coma and escapes from the hospital in Kill Bill, she struggles to get her paralyzed feet to regain sensation. For what seems like minutes these totemic toes fill the screen. The guy digs her dogs, and he turns them into something huge and pure pop on the screen -- you want to shout at them toes to start a-wiggling." (Village Voice)

We'll pass on asking what sparks his obsession with bizarre forms of sex. Two white guys joke about being raped by black men in Reservoir Dogs, while two white guys rape a black man in Pulp Fiction. Oh yeah, and sex with a female coma patient is truly disgusting even if it is Uma Thurman.

But her feet? Hey, to each his own.

Copyright 2004 by Luis Calvo.

 

Luis Calvo works on the calendar desk of the Miami Herald. He's written features for Hispanic.  His e-mail: LCalvo@herald.com.

 

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